Category Archives: Camping

The Rules of Cornhole

Cornhole is bound to be found in just about any campground you visit, and maybe even in your own backyard. But, do you know the rules?

The American Cornhole Association, yes there is such a thing, has put the rules down for you. Now there is no excuses for cheating.

Cornhole Rules
Here are the official rules set by the American Cornhole Association. These have been created as a general guideline to try and make a set of standards for tournament play around the country. We want to make sure you have every chance at learning these rules and carrying them out during your cornhole game.

1. Cornhole Game Layout
a) Dimensions of Cornhole Court – You should try to make the area of play around 10 feet by 45 feet. This will give you a lot of room without worrying about throwing your bags into spectators or cars. Within this area is where you will place your boards. You will also have a pitchers box and a foul line which is indicated by the image. A quick tip is to try to setup your cornhole area north to south to avoid being blinded by the sunlight.

b) Cornhole Pitcher’s Box – This isn’t a steadfast rule, but if you plan on playing in some tournaments, it is definitely good to know. The pitcher’s box is typically a 4 ft by 3ft invisible area on each side of the boards in which you will be throwing the bean bags from. When it comes to tossing the bags, it is ok for children to move up so they have a better chance at scoring points.

c) Foul Lines – If you were to step past the pitcher’s box when tossing the bags, rules state that you have now crossed the foul line. Tournament rules dictate you aren’t allowed to throw past the the front of the cornhole boards.

2. Cornhole Playing Equipment
a) Cornhole Boards
I. Each bag toss board needs to be 48″ X 24″ rectangle made of half inch plywood. Wood is the most commonly used material for boards and therefor rules want a consistent play time after time.

II. The hole cut within the boards should be six inches in diameter. The location of the hole is always centered at the top of the set. The exact measurements are 9 inches from the top and 12 inches left to right. This gives plenty of room for the bags to land and slide.

III. The front of the board needs to be 2-1/2″ inches from top to bottom.

IV. The back of the board needs to be 12″ inches from the ground to highest point.

V. The bag toss playing surface needs to be sanded to a very smooth texture and and there shouldn’t be any blemishes or chips in the wood that could disrupt play.

VI. The cornhole board can be painted with a high gloss paint allowing cornhole bags to slide, but not not slippery enough to allow them to slide back down.

VII. Cornhole Bags will be made of two fabric squares with at least double stitching a quarter inch in on all sides. Each bag toss bag should be made of duck canvas and filled with corn feed. Once completed, bags need to be 6″X6″ and 14 to 16 ounces.

3. Pitching Distances
a) Adult Play – As long as you stand behind the foul line and in the pitchers box, you are good to go. The average distance is around 30 feet..

b) Juniors – Kids can really play from any distance depending on age. They should know the basics of the rules, but we want it to be fun for anyone.

cornhole bag toss 4. Play of the Game
a) Singles or Doubles Play – Cornhole / Bag Toss is a game that is suited for either 2 or 4 people. If you plan on playing singles, you are essentially going up against one other person. If you are playing doubles, you then have a partner and are going up against two other people. Most common play and rules are to have a four person game to make the game go faster and be more enjoyable.

b) Innings – Every time you throw your 4 bean bags, the corn toss inning is considered over. There are no min or max amount of innings, but rather the rules say the first team to 21 wins. Just make sure you throw all four of your cornhole bags.

c) Points from the cornhole bag

I. Corn Bag In-The-Hole – If you land one of your bags in the hole cutout on the board, you will have scored three points.

II. Corn Bag In-The-Count – If you land one of your bags on the boards platform, but not in the hole, you will have scored one point.

III. Corn Bag Out-Of-The-County – When your land a cornhole bag off the board and not in the hole, you are awarded no points. [Continued]

50 Ways to Find Morel Mushrooms

Before you know it, morel mushrooms will be popping up out of the ground.

Some years are better for finding these delicacies than others. But if you have some tricks up your sleeves, you’ll have a better chance of finding morels. Even when the rest of the hunters aren’t.

Mike Krebill and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources has put together 50 tips for finding more morels this spring.

THE CHANCES OF FINDING MORELS IMPROVE WHEN DAYTIME TEMPERATURES REACH THE 60S AND NIGHTTIME TEMPERATURES ARE IN THE 50S. MORE SPECIFICALLY, A SOIL TEMPERATURE OF 53 DEGREES IS THE TIME TO START LOOKING. VARIABLES AFFECTING GROUND WARMTH INCLUDE TYPE OF SOIL (WELL-DRAINED SANDY SOILS WARM UP MORE QUICKLY THAN CLAY), THE DEGREE THAT THE GROUND SLOPES AND ITS ASPECT (WHETHER THE SLOPE FACES NORTH OR SOUTH), THE AMOUNT OF SUN OR SHADE, SOIL MOISTURE AND THE TIME OF DAY. SOIL TEMPERATURE AT ONE LOCATION CAN VARY AS MUCH AS EIGHT DEGREES A DAY… [CONTINUED]

Keep Ticks Off With This DIY Repellant [Video]

Ticks are one of the nastiest animals in the woods. Some are barely the size of a pin head. So how are you supposed to spot them? Well, you can’t. Whether you sneak through thick brush or just take a casual walk, you’re at risk for invasion if you’re not using some kind of tick repellant.

This Realtree video shows just how easy it is to make ticks bug off.

Make Your Own Poison Ivy Remedy [VIDEO]

It’s that time of year again! Poison Ivy is out in full force. Do you have a remedy?

If you spend any time outdoors in the woods, or even in your own back yard, you may encounter poison ivy.

Some people are lucky and aren’t disturbed by it. Me, I get poison ivy, and I get it bad. I’m always looking for new ways to take the itch away and dry it up. This might very well be the remedy I am looking for.

Check out this video. You’ll learn to make your own poison ivy remedy, and save some money at the store on that expensive medicine that doesn’t always work.

But, what if there was a way to never get poison ivy again?

Never Get Poison Ivy Again [ Video]

Do you suffer the itchiness and rash that come with coming in contact with poison ivy? Unless you are one of the lucky ones, you probably do.

Wouldn’t it be nice to never have a serious case of poison ivy again? Dr. Jim Brauker, a retired scientist who studied skin inflammation for 25 years, has the information you need to avoid the itch. See his solution in this video.

Build a Cabin for Less Than $2,000

Most people would love to have a cabin at hunting or fishing camp, a place to escape to, or an awesome man cave. The problem that most people run in to is the expense involved with such a project. Maybe you should build your own.

Outdoor Life‘s Brandon Butler reveals how you can build your own cabin for less than $2,000.

IT AIN’T THE RITZ, BUT IT’LL BE A PLACE TO WARM YOUR BONES.

MATERIALS

WALLS
2 2″X4″X16′ PT BD.
4 2″X4″X16′ BD.
2 2″X4″X12′ PT BD.
4 2″X4″X12′ BD.
40 2″X4″X92 5/8″ PRECUT STUDS
18 4’X8′ SHEETS EXT. REV. BOARD
1 32″ DOOR & KNOB
2 24″X36″ WINDOWS… [CONTINUED]

Illustration: Kagan McLeod

How a Cricket Can Tell you the Temperature

If you’re out in the wilderness without a thermometer and you want to know the temperature, there’s a natural way to check. Find yourself a cricket.

The fact is a little strange, but is has been around for a long time. This formula, endorsed by The Farmer’s Almanac, is stood the test of time.

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Fahrenheit, count the number of chirps in 14 seconds then add 40 to get the temperature.

Example: 22 chirps + 40 = 62 F

To convert cricket chirps to degrees Celsius, count the number of chirps in 25 seconds, divide by 3, then add 4.

Example: 54/3 + 4 = 22 C

Of course this will only work when the crickets are chirping. Male crickets chirp to attract females. This only happens when the temperature is above 55 degrees F and the guys are looking for a lady cricket.

How to Make an Alaskan ULU Knife [Video]

Alaskans have used Ulu knives for generations. The native Alaskan people crafted the first Ulu knife more than 5,000 ago. Inuit women primarily used the knife for skinning and cleaning fish. Throughout history, the Ulu knife played an important role in the survival of the Inuit people.

The Inuit originally made their Ulu blades of polished slate and gave them a bone, ivory, or wood handle. The maker of the knife will often inscribe the handle with their own distinctive designs or markings.

Now you can make your very own with these easy steps offered by Outdoor Life.

1. CUT THE BLADE FROM AN OLD TEMPERED CROSSCUT SAW. LAY OUT THE PATTERN OF YOUR BLADE, TYPICALLY 120 DEGREES (THE WIDTH IS UP TO YOU), AND CONNECT THE TWO SIDES WITH A SEMI-CIRCLE, WHICH WILL BE THE CUTTING SURFACE… [CONTINUED]

Did You Know A Lemon Can Be Used As A Fire Starter? [Video]

If you ever find yourself in a situation where you need a fire, all you need is a lemon and a few other items you probably wouldn’t carry camping, and you’re in luck.

That’s right. A lemon can actually be used to start a fire. The acid from the lemon is enough to provide electricity to ignite a fire.

You might think it would be easier to use a lighter, and it would. But this would be a neat project to teach survival skills.

Watch this video to see how easy it is.

25 Pratical Uses for a Bandana

Have you ever wondered how bandanas became a thing?  Have you ever wondered what a bandana is good for besides blowing your nose, your keep sweat out of your eyes?

I imagine just about everyone has a bandana or two in the back of a sock drawer somewhere. But what are they good for? If you’ve ever asked yourself these important questions, you’ve come to the right place.

Sure, they can keep the sweat from running down your face, or you can use them to blow your nose (Ugh!). But it might surprise you to find that there are many uses for this simple piece of cloth.

Outdoor Life‘s Tim MacWelch has put together 25 mostly practical uses for a bandana.

1. Signal – a bright colored bandana can be hung up as a flag over a campsite that might be lost in tight brush or tall grasses, or swing it around on a stick as a signal flag.

2. Bag – tie opposing corners together to make a bag to carry all sorts of loose items…
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