Category Archives: Food

The Best Chile Con Carne Recipe [Video]

The days are getting shorter, and the temperatures are rapidly dropping.  This means three things are currently happening.  Hunters are looking for that big buck, Chile con Carne is on the stove, and maybe some football.

Do you have a favorite Chile con Carne recipe?  If not, check out this recipe from the folks at Deer Hunting.

 

A Better Way to Skin A Deer [Video]

Ok, so maybe there is not wrong or right way to skin a deer as long as you get the job done.

But, it is always nice to see a quick, effective way to skin one without getting hair everywhere.

Dearmeatfordinner has a good video you should watch if you are looking for a better way to skin your deer.  Check out this video.

How to Make Acorn Pancakes

Acorns seem to be everywhere you look.  Sure, wildlife loves a good meal of an acorn or too.  But, you can enjoy them too,

Jamie Carlson explains how to make acorn flour that can be used to make acorn pancakes in an article for Outdoor Life.

 

When I was 11 or 12 years old, I read a book called My Side of the Mountain It’s a story about a 15 year old boy who runs away from his home in New York City to live in the Catskill Mountains. He lives in the wilderness for a whole year, surviving off the land. One of the things he did while out in the woods was grind acorn flour, and make pancakes with it. I remember reading that at the time and wanting to try it. Well, 30 years later, I have finally gone through the process and can now say that I’ve also made pancakes out of acorn flour.

The process for making flour out of acorns isn’t actually very difficult, but it is time consuming and a little tedious at times. [Continued]

Arby’s Will Begin Selling Venison Sandwiches Nation Wide

As hunters, we prefer to kill our own deer to meat in the freezer.  But when all else fails, we can always go to Arby’s.

Well, beginning October 21st, you can go to any of the more than 3,300 Arby’s and get yourself a deer sandwich while supplies last.

WXOW ABC Channel 19 out of Lacrosse has more about this story.

Arby’s is bringing the venison sandwich to all 3,300 restaurants across the country after a trial run in a handful of states last year, according to a representative with Arby’s.

The venison sandwiches will available starting Oct. 21 while supplies last, Arby’s representative Matt Baker told our affiliate in Wausau Newsline 9.

The sandwiches are expected to sell out quickly, Baker said.

The venison sandwich was available for a few days at select restaurants in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia, last year.

The only store in Wisconsin that featured the sandwich was in Superior.

Something else new this year: a limited-edition Elk Sandwich will be available in three restaurants in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana.

Bullheads – The Underrated Fish

No doubt, bullheads are not the prettiest fish in the water, but, boy do they taste good. Seasons and limits on bullheads are very generous compared to other fish. Bullheads are aggressive feeders that put up one heck of a fight once hooked. They might not be known for pulling hard, but they will not give up easily. All of these put together make bullheads a great fish for fast and fun fishing action that keeps fisherman happy for hours.

Because of the bullheads aggressive feeding habits they are a pretty easy fish to catch. They will eat anything from bologna, hot dogs to dough balls. However, my favorite bait is a night crawler on a size 2 long-shank hook. Bullheads are known to swallow the hook more times than not. The long shank on the hook will makes it easier to get to with a pair of needle-nosed pliers. Another good hook is the circle hook that will likely hook the fish in the corner of the mouth, but not always.

There is not much involved with fishing tackle for the bullhead. A light-to-medium spinning rod and reel with 6-pound line is more than adequate. Add a splitshot sinker a foot above the hook and you are ready to fish. Bullheads feed on or near the bottom and the sinker will put your bait right where it needs to be.

Bullheads are relatively shallow during the springtime and throughout early summer, with the fishing be good during daylight hours as well as after dark. They can be found feeding aggressively in areas with muddy bottoms. All that has to be done is throw the night crawler out, let it sink, and then wait. There is no need to put any movement into the bait. If there are bullheads around, they will bite.

After the bullheads have spawned and we get more into the summer months, the fish will move to deeper water in the 12 – 16 foot range. During these warm summer months I recommend night fishing. Everything else is the same though: fishing the bottom with a night crawler.

Bullheads are nothing more than a catfish. They too, like a channel cat, has the dorsal and lateral spines that can “sting” you. Hold the fish by the fishing line and with your other hand, slide the fish up from the tail section until your palm comes to the back side of the dorsal spine. Next, grip the bullhead while keeping a watchful eye on the lateral spines. Before you know it, handling a bullhead will be second nature.

Some people like to fillet bullheads like any other fish. I like to clean bullheads the same as I do any catfish. Skinning a bullhead is very easy with a couple of cuts and a couple of pairs of pliers. That way the spines can be eliminated by simply snipping them off, which makes the fish easier to skin. Use one pair of pliers to grab the lower lip of the fish, cut a line in the skin around the head, grab this skin with the other pair of pliers, and pull. With a little practice, you will be able to peel the skin back in one piece.

The only thing that is left to do is enjoy the taste of the delectable fish. They are wonderful to eat with a texture unlike any other fish I have ate before.

Black Walnut-Crusted Bullheads

4 fresh or frozen bullhead fillets
Salt and pepper
¼ cup milk
1 egg
2 cups cornflakes, finely crushed
¼ cup finely chopped black walnuts
1 Tablespoon butter
¼ cup pure maple syrup
¼ cup butter, softened

Thaw fish if frozen. Rinse fish; pat dry with paper towels. Season with salt and pepper. Measure thickness of fish fillets. In a shallow dish, beat together milk and egg with a fork. In another shallow dish, combine the cornflakes and walnuts. Dip fish fillets in milk mixture, allowing excess to drip off. Dip coated fish fillets in walnut mixture, turning to coat evenly. In a large skillet, melt the 1 tablespoon butter over medium heat. Cook fish, half at a time, in hot butter for 4 to 6 minutes per ½-thickness, or until golden brown and fish flakes easily with a fork, turning once. Reduce heat as necessary to prevent over browning. For maple sauce: In a small saucepan, bring syrup to boiling. Remove from heat and whisk in ¼ cup butter until well combined. Serve with fish.

Wild Turkey – How to Smoke and Brine

It’s that time of the year, when you need to be thinking about what you will do with the wild turkey you hopefully kill this year.

If you’re like many, you hope many meals will involve a turkey.

Do you know how to brine your turkey, and get it ready for the smoker?

Stacy Harris of Game and Garden.com did a wonderful job explaining the process of brining a turkey.
Try this technique this season for a mouth-watering wild turkey breast.

It’s a new take on dinner using a turkey you harvested. Of course, you could use a domestic turkey, but using a breast from a bird you harvested would be so much more cooler.

Spicy Goose Jerky is Simple to Make [Video]

This year has been good for goose hunting, and we have had more than we can handle.

Of course we haven given a lot to family and friends, and cooked a lot for ourselves.  But the same old smoked and fried goose was needing a change.

This is when I started searching for alternative methods of cooking it and came up with this recipe for Spicy Goose Jerky from Scott Leysath of Ducks Unlimited.

Jerky is our favorite in our house, and this goose jerky did  not change that.

Long before refrigeration, there was jerky. For thousands of years, humans have been preserving meat by drying it in the sun or by using other sources of heat. Early American settlers learned that practically any kind of well-trimmed meat could be transformed into jerky. Meat strips were cured with salt and then dried by hanging them over the sides of covered wagons or slowly smoking them over a smoldering campfire. Along the way, the pioneers discovered how to add more flavor to the meat, and I’ll bet they also learned a thing or two about food safety.

I must admit to a number of failed attempts at making jerky. My initial motivation was financial. As a college student who spent almost as much time in the field as in the classroom, I quickly discovered that store-bought jerky was expensive. I reasoned that I could save hundreds of dollars a year by making my own jerky and that all the money I saved could be better spent on something useful—like beer. From these first attempts, I learned that you can’t rush jerky. If you can dry the meat at 160 degrees, the process will not go twice as fast at 320 degrees. Oh sure, you can eat it, but it’s not jerky. A few decades later, I’m still tweaking recipes and methods to produce tasty jerky that will have my friends asking for more in the goose pit.

Making your own jerky from game meat not only saves money but also frees up space in your freezer, since packaged jerky takes up less room than unprocessed game meat. Most jerky recipes can be used for any type of antlered game or waterfowl, but you do need to take extra time to completely trim all silver skin, gristle, and fat from the meat. Silver skin or gristle left on the meat will be tough and chewy, and fat may become rancid. [Continued]

Grilling a Whole Pig in Your Backyard

Have you ever had the desire to cook a whole pig in your backyard, but you didn’t know how?

Just a couple of months ago after a successful hog hunt in Oklahoma, I wished I had this information.

Field & Stream‘s T. Edward Nickens will teach you how to cook a 75- to 125-lb. hog in your backyard.

Cooking a whole pig (in this case, a 75- to 125-pounder, butterflied and with hair removed) in a backyard pit puts the neighborhood on notice: You’re taking the party to a new level. Come hungry, y’all, and bring your friends. This D.I.Y. cooker goes up, and breaks down, in an hour tops. Check local laws about open fires in town limits, but many larger cities allow open flames as long as you’re cooking. And, brother, you will be cooking! …[continued]

Collecting Black Walnut Sap: The New Maple Syrup?

We’ve all heard of tapping into maple trees to gather sap with which to make fresh syrup. What many don’t realize is that you can do the same thing with black walnut trees.

Not as popular as maple syrup, black walnut trees can produce a quality syrup that some enjoy as much as maple syrup. Hobby Farms has the step-by-step guide.

Maple trees aren’t the only sugar bushes that offer the prime ingredient for delicious syrup—sap can be tapped from birch, walnut, sycamore, boxelder and ironwood trees, as well. Where I live in Kentucky, we don’t have many sugar maples, but walnut trees are everywhere. The trees were once used for their nut crop or as a timber source to be cut down and sold to support a farmer’s retirement. Syrup tapping is rare in these parts, but when I came across several articles about tapping walnut trees for their sap, I knew I had to try it… [continued]

Using a Beer Cooler to Cook the Perfect Steak

Do You Enjoy a Well Cooked Steak?  Then you need a beer cooler.

You might not want to pack your grill up just yet, but a perfect steak can be prepared in your beer cooler. We admit, it might sound a little absurd, but Field & Stream‘s Jonathan Miles thinks otherwise.

Miles explains how to cook the perfect venison loin with only a beer cooler, a zip-seal bag, some hot water, and a digital thermometer.

BY PERFECT, I MEAN PERFECT: MEDIUM-RARE FROM THE OUTSIDE IN AND SPECTACULARLY, SUCCULENTLY TENDER. AND IT’S FOOLPROOF—YOU CAN’T OVERCOOK IT. AND NO JOKE: YOU COOK IT IN A BEER COOLER. A LITTLE BIT OF BACKSTORY, BEFORE I TELL YOU HOW.

THIS IS A DOWNHOME RIFF ON AN AVANT-GARDE COOKING TECHNIQUE KNOWN AS SOUS VIDE (FRENCH FOR “UNDER VACUUM”). BY VACUUM-SEALING MEATS (OR ANYTHING ELSE) AND THEN COOKING THEM IN A TEMPERATURE-CONTROLLED WATER BATH, CHEFS TURN OUT INCREDIBLY LUSCIOUS CUTS. UNLIKE TRADITIONALLY COOKED MEATS, THERE ARE NO VARIATIONS IN THE DONENESS—THAT IS, THERE’S NO PINK CENTER TO A MEDIUM-RARE TENDERLOIN BECAUSE THE WHOLE THING—EVEN THE OUTSIDE—IS UNIFORMLY PINK. (THE EXTERIOR CAN BE QUICKLY BROWNED AFTERWARD, IF DESIRED.) PRECISE HEAT CONTROL MEANS THAT ­MEDIUM-RARE IS EXACTLY THAT. SOUS VIDE HAS REVOLUTIONIZED RESTAURANT KITCHENS, AND THANKS TO THE ­COOKING-TECH GURU NATHAN MYHRVOLD, WHO ADAPTED A SLEW OF LABORATORY-LEVEL TECHNIQUES LIKE SOUS VIDE FOR HOME KITCHENS IN HIS BOOK MODERNIST CUISINE AT HOME, AND WHO INSPIRED THIS BACKWOODS VARIATION, IT MIGHT REVOLUTIONIZE YOUR HUNTING CAMP, TOO…[CONTINUED]