Tag Archives: deer hunting

Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer [Video]

Unfortunately not every deer shot by hunters will be easy to recover. Maybe the hit was too far back or too high. Maybe, there is not much blood sign to follow. I learnt many years ago that there is still a very good opportunity to recover your shot deer by letting your dog follow the sign to your prize. Yes, this might sound weird, but a properly trained dog just might be the extra help you need.

Why can’t a dog be trained to follow the scent of deer blood? The answer is that he can. With just a few minutes each day in as little as one month, any dog, no matter the breed or size, can be trained to be a “blood-hound”. The trick is to train your dog to follow the scent of blood, not the scent of a deer. You do not want your dog chasing every deer it smells.

A dog wants nothing more than to make his owner happy. There is no question that a dog that is well cared for and treated with respect 365 days a year is more likely to perform well for his handler the few times you might actually need him. Compared to a dog that is not treated well.

Start the training by teaching the dog basic commands like stop, stay and slow. It is good to be able to control the dog while in the woods. After your dog has mastered these commands, it is time to start training your dog to trail blood.

I start working with my dog a couple of months before deer season begins. I use blood from a deer that was killed the previous year that has been kept in the freezer*. A couple of days before you are ready to start training take the blood out of the freezer to thaw. By the time season roles around two months later, the dog will be more than ready to trail the scent of blood.

A hunter has two ways to obtain the blood for training. Either from a previous kill, or blood obtained from a butcher shop. Drop the blood for a couple hundred yards or so along a trail in a zigzag fashion. Use more blood when you first start training your dog, than what you will use as the dog advances in his training. At first, you might have to use as much as two pints. As your dog gets better as a blood-hound a few drops every 7 to 8 yards is enough.

When starting out, use a short lead that is no more than 10 feet long to control your dog while on the trail. Keep your dog calm by rubbing him and talking to him in a gentle voice.

Allow your dog to smell the blood. If you have to put the dog’s nose down to the blood, do it. But be gentle. Repeat the command “search” a few times. Eventually he will be able to associate the word search with the smell of blood. Let your dog follow the blood trail while you control the pace. Do not let him run. A slow walk is best until the dog has trailing understood. Continue to follow the blood trail until the dog has a grasp of what it is suppose to be doing.

Just like when you take a young child hunting, do not let your dog get bored with the experience. If the dog is no longer having fun, he will not want to go back out and try it again. As soon as the dog shows that he is tired, stop for the day.

The dog has to know when he has reached the end of the trail during the training. Saturate a rag with deer blood to simulate a dead deer. Place the blood soaked rag at the end of the blood trail. When your dog finds the rag, reward him. Pleasing you pleases your dog. When he knows how to make you happy he will want to do it again and again.

Work with your dog 15 minutes a day for a month. By the end of the month your dog will be pretty darn good at the art of trailing deer. Two months of this and he will be as close to perfect as you can hope for. After your dog has been out of action between seasons, remind him of what to do by having him run a couple mock blood trails.

While on the blood trail, if your dog starts moving erratically, his tail is still and he stops smelling the ground, chances are that he lost the trail. Take your dog back to where you know there is blood and let him go at it again. When he begins to bark and growl, your deer is close by. Keep in mind that the deer still might be alive so be ready for a follow up shot.

While you are hunting, make sure your dog is well cared for. Supply your dog with a bed and blanket for comfort. Keep this in the floor of your truck while you are hunting. Your beloved dog is sure to be thirsty after spending time on the trail. Have water available for your dog when you return to your vehicle so he can quench his thirst. A dog that is warm and well rested will perform better when the time comes, than one that has been left in the cold.

This is a new approach to find a wounded deer. Other hunters may think you are little nuts at first. This will quickly change when they begin to see the results. It will not take long for your dog to be the most popular amongst your hunting buddies. Do not be surprised if your friends unexpectedly want to baby sit your dog one night shortly after sun set.

* Blood can be kept in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for several weeks or in the freezer up to a year.

Check out how this 14 year old dog finds a gut shot deer in just a few minutes.

Will Your Bow be Ready for Deer Season?

Deer season has been over for several months now. Some hunters are OK with waiting for fall to roll back around, but most are ready to get outdoors and enjoy what summer has to offer. Now is the perfect time to start shooting your bow at home, at a 3-D course, or in a league.

Maybe you are looking to purchase a new bow, or just tune the one you already have. It varies among archers how often they bring their bow in for a check-up, but I recommend not waiting more than 2 years. If your gear sees a lot of action, bring it to the shop yearly.

Now is the time to make changes to your bow and accessories if at all possible. Two years ago, my bow limb cracked while I was hunting out of state waiting for my home opener. With only three days before the Illinois bow season opened, I was buying a new bow. Now this was something that was out of my control, but too many hunters make changes too close to the beginning of season that could and should have been done months before.

Don’t make changes, like a new arrow rest or type of broadheads, and expect your arrows to fly true. To avoid frustration and undo stress, make any changes to your gear as early in the year as you can. This will give you plenty of time to work out any flaws in your set-up, and to get your arrows shooting tight groups.

Something as simple as changing the type of release you use can cause negative consequences to your shooting. Knowing this, make any changes to your equipment, what is on your bow, or in your quiver as early as you can.

It is especially important to make changes early if you are buying a new bow, shafts or broadheads. Even though I killed a nice deer eleven days after having to purchase the new bow I mentioned before, I feel lucky to have been able to get my bow ready in time. Under normal circumstances it would have taken me the entire summer to feel comfortable enough to take a new bow to the woods.

One thing hunters do not think about are the muscles used to pull a bow back. These muscles are rarely used for other activities, and take some time to get built up. The best way to do this is to shoot your bow every day. Not only will you become a better shot, but your muscles will have gained the necessary strength back.

I mentioned at the very beginning of this article about getting out and shooting your bow, or joining a league. I can’t think of anything better to get you prepared for the upcoming season. Not only does practice make you a better shot, but the more time you spend shooting, your confidence will skyrocket and you will be a better hunter for it. If you are confident hitting a target at 30-yards, a 15-yard shot at a deer will be simple.

Also, practice helps you judge distance. Rangefinders are nice, and I recommend all hunters having one, but you can’t rely on one at all times. With practice at unknown yardage, judging distance will be easier when the battery is dead on your rangefinder, or you don’t have time to use it.

A change that sometimes skips the mind of hunters is that you might have to adjust your sight pins if you increase or decrease the poundage your are pulling. It might also mean changing the size of the arrow you are shooting if you change you draw weight.

Fall is the best time to be a deer hunter, but hunting is a year-round endeavor, and that includes having your bow ready.

Doe Management: 4 Does in 9 Seconds [Video]

I am sure most of us have heard about doe management, but how many does are too many.

One hunter in Maryland shot 4 does in 9 seconds.

I am sure some areas of the country need a lot of does removed, and this hunter certainly did his part.

Follow this link to some good deer hunting advice,and check out this video to see how it all went down

Hunter Misses His Mark, Shoots Buck in Antler [VIDEO]

As hunters, we’ve all made a bad shot on an animal. If you hunt long enough, it’s bound to happen. Every hunter misses eventually.

When it does happen, all we can hope for is to recover the animal, or that the wound was not life-threatening. We hate to do it, and for most of us, it’s a rare occurrence.

Mistakes are made for a number of reasons. The animal might have moved, the arrow or bullet may have hit an object in flight, buck fever… the list is endless.

I couldn’t even guess as to why this hunter missed, but I can tell you it was not a fatal injury. You can tell that the targeted buck was not happy, as he stares down the hunter. I wonder what was going through the hunter and the deer’s mind after this shot.

12-Year-Old Hits Two Deer with One Arrow

It’s important to always know your target — and what’s behind your target. It’s also very important to never shoot at a deer that’s standing in front of another deer.  The last thing you want to do is shoot two deer.
Sure, it’s possible that both deer might die if an arrow passes through one deer and travels into a second. But it’s also very likely the second deer would only be wounded and left to suffer, possibly to die a slow death.
So what if you have only one deer tag and you did kill two deer? Game wardens rarely have sympathy, even when it is accident. Check out what happens in this video.

In the end, a conservation officer was contacted, and both deer were tagged. This is a good reminder to always know your target, and what is beyond it.

Hanging A Deer. Is There A Right or Wrong Way?

Hunters all have their favirite wsy of doing things. Once they get accustomed to doing something a certain way, they’re not an easy group to change.
Even when it comes to hanging a deer.

This is true whether you’re talking about their hunting tactics or the ways in which they process their deer.

To hang a deer by its head or back feet? It’s a question that has had hunters arguing for ages.

Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Now, Outdoor Life addresses the pros and cons.

There’s more than one way to skin a cat, but what about a deer? A small minority of deer hunters get all their skinning and butchering work done at ground level, but the rest of us usually opt for a solid meat pole where we can hang our deer, tell lies, and sip a beverage while meat is made. But before the venison flag is raised, first you need to decide how to hang the deer. Is it better to hang the deer with its head up or hindquarters up? [continued]

Make your Treestand the Envy of Other Hunters

If you’re like me, your treestand is hung in the tree just as it comes out of the box. No fancy gadgets or other fluff added.

But maybe we’re missing out on items that would make our hunt more comfortable. After all, a comfortable hunter can often stay in the woods longer. And we all know that the more time we spend in the woods improves our odds of shooting the buck we’ve been scouting all summer. Field & Stream has came out with eight simple and inexpensive add-ons to our treestand that could make your next hunt more enjoyable.

With $125 worth of easy add-ons and D.I.Y. tweaks, you can turn a favorite ladder stand, like my Millennium L220 ($400; ­millennium​stands.com), into a silent Barca­lounger in the sky—comfortable enough to sit in all day and quiet enough to get the drop on the cagiest bucks. Whether you’re enduring a rainstorm or a freeze, these improvements will help keep you in the hunt for as long as it takes… [continued]

Photo: Field & Stream (above)

Watch This Perfect Quick and Ethical Heart Shot [VIDEO]

As hunters, we strive to achieve the most ethical and humane shot on animals as possible, as those shots will quickly put an animal down. Hunters debate whether to shoot for lungs or heart. I prefer the heart shot ,because any deer shot in the heart will go down very quickly, and stay down. As the saying goes, “the proof is in the pudding.”
Watch as this deer that has been shot in the heart expires quickly.
This is humane and ethical shooting as its finest.

Muzzy Offers Complete Arrow and Bolt Packages

For more than 30 years Muzzy has been known for their superior line of broadheads.  Now Muzzy is offering complete arrow and bolt packages ready for the field.

Rage Broadheads did something similar recently with great results.

Muzzy Outdoors, the makers of the world’s number-one selling fixed-blade broadhead, has partnered with Gold Tip to offer ready-to-shoot Muzzy “Bad to the Bone” Arrow package. This new package allows archers to spend more time in the field hunting and less time setting up their bows.

The new “Bad to the Bone” Arrow package combines Gold Tip’s popular pre-fletched and nocked .340 carbon arrows with the bone-crushing Muzzy 3-blade 225 100 grain-broadhead. The arrows are pre-cut to 29.5 inches to fit most archer’s bow setups and have a straightness of  ± .006 inch and weight tolerance of ± 2.0 grain. The hardened-steel Trocar tip on the Muzzy 225, cuts on contact and shatters bone, providing maximum penetration. The aluminum ferrule is precision machined and the blades are precisely oriented for maximum arrow flight stability and to minimize planing.

Designed for draw weights up to 70 lbs., the Muzzy “Bad to the Bone” Arrow package comes with three fletched and nocked arrows, three Muzzy 225 broadheads and three 100-grain field points. The package is available at retailers nationwide and conveniently online atwww.muzzy.comfor a suggested retail price of $49.99.

Founded in 1984, Muzzy is the number-one name in fixed-blade broadheads, and it is a pioneer in the art of bowfishing. A division of FeraDyne Outdoors, Muzzy is headquartered in Superior, Wis. For more information on the full line of Muzzy’s fixed-blade broadheads and state-of-the-art bowfishing equipment, contact Muzzy Outdoors, LLC, 101 Main Street, Superior, WI 54880; call 866-387-9307; or visitwww.muzzy.com.

Don’t worry, Muzzy also has crossbow hunters covered too.

Muzzy Outdoors, the makers of the world’s number-one selling fixed-blade broadhead, has taken the guesswork out of setting up a crossbow for both practice and hunting by combining a super durable bolt, with a universal nock system and a bone-crushing broadhead.

The Muzzy “Bad to the Bone” Bolt package features the Muzzy 225 Crossbow 3-Blade, 100-grain broadhead that is designed with an aircraft-grade aluminum ferrule, stainless steel blades and the legendary bone-busting Trocar tip. The ferrule is designed to perfectly match the diameter of the bolt for increased accuracy and penetration. Each bolt comes pre-fletched and is compatible with either Omni or Half-Moon nocks.

The new Muzzy “Bad to Bone” bolt package comes with three Victory bolts—in either 20- or 22-inch lengths—three Muzzy 225X 100-grain broadheads, three field points, three Omni nocks and three Half-Moon nocks. This ready-to-shoot bolt package is available at retailers nationwide and conveniently online at www.muzzy.com for a suggested retail price of $49.99.

TruGlo Introduces Their Line of New Titanium Broadheads

TruGlo is known for their bowhunting accessories like sights, rest and more. Now they are in the broadhead market.

Pure Instinct Hunting has more information on these state of the art broadheads.

TRUGLO, Inc. introduces the all new TitaniumX family of performance broadheads for 2017.  These mechanical and fixed-blade broadheads are available in for both compound bows and crossbows in several blade configurations.

Precision broadheads for hunters, by hunters. TITANIUM X™ broadheads are spin tested and sharpness tested to ensure ultimate performance and quick kills.  A CNC-machined titanium ferrule provides the unwavering strength and consistency needed to fly like a field point and punch through bone.  The TRU•CUT™ titanium tip slices hide and flesh immediately upon impact and the tough stainless steel blades cut a devastating wound channel for maximum blood loss and easier tracking. [Continued]