Tag Archives: Hunting

Warthog with Crosssbow [Slow-Motion Video]

Bayly Sippel Safaris in South Africa offers many species of animals to hunt on dozens of concessions. One thing South Africa has plenty of are Warthogs. Having had the pleasure to recently hunt with Bayly Sippel, I know they have plenty of warthogs, along with just about all the plains and dangerous game animals hunters are after.  But, there is just something about a warthog.
Before continuing with this article to learn more about warthogs, check out this video as Gibby Gibson smokes a giant Warthog with a crossbow. If you like what you see, get in contact with Bayly Sippel Safaris to learn how affordable it is to book your own hunt.

Many people have only seen photos of warthogs, and don’t know a lot about them.
Out To Africa has some information to help you learn a little more about these critters.
Neither graceful nor beautiful, warthogs are nonetheless remarkable animals. They are found in most of Africa south of the Sahara and are widely distributed in East Africa. They are the only pigs able to live in areas without water for several months of the year. By tolerating a higher-than-normal body temperature, the warthog is perhaps able to conserve moisture inside its body that might otherwise be used for cooling. (Camels and desert gazelles have developed a similar mechanism for survival in hot, arid environments.
Physical Characteristics
Males weigh 20 to 50 pounds more than females, but both are distinguished by disproportionately large heads and the warts-thick protective-pads that appear on both sides of the head. Two large pairs of warts occur below the eyes, and between the eyes and the tusks, and a very small pair is found near the jaw (usually just in males).
The face is fairly flat and the snout elongated. Eyes set high on the head enables the warthog to keep a lookout for predators even when it lowers its head to feed on short grass. The warthog’s large tusks are unusual: The two upper ones emerge from the sides of the snout to form a semicircle; the lower tusks at the base of the uppers are worn to a sharp cutting edge.
Sparse bristles cover the warthog’s body, although longer bristles form a mane from the top of the head down the spine to the middle of the back. The skin is gray or black (or yellowish or reddish, if the warthog has been wallowing in mud). The long tail ends with a tuft of bristles. The warthog characteristically carries its tail upright when it runs, the tuft waving like a tiny flag. As the young run in single file, the tail position may serve as a signal to keep them all together. Warthogs trot with a springy gait but they are known to run surprisingly fast.
Habitat
Warthogs are found in moist and arid savannas. They avoid rainforest, deserts and high mountains.
Behavior
When water is available, warthogs drink regularly and enjoy wallowing in muddy places. As part of their grooming they also take sand baths, rub against trees and termite mounds and let tick birds pick insects off their bodies.
Warthogs live in family groups of a female and her young. Sometimes another female will join the group. Males normally live by themselves, only joining the groups to mate. Warthogs engage in ritual fights in which they charge straight on, clashing heads when they meet. Fights between males can be violent and bloody.
Warthogs sleep and rest in holes, which at times they line with grass, perhaps to make them warmer. Although they can excavate, warthogs normally do not dig holes but use those dug by other animals, preferably aardvarks.
Diet
The warthog is mainly a grazer and has adapted an interesting practice of kneeling on its calloused, hairy, padded knees to eat short grass. Using its snout and tusks, it also digs for bulbs, tubers and roots during the dry season.
Caring for the Young
Before giving birth to a new litter, the female chases away the litter she has been raising and secludes herself. These juveniles may join up with another solitary female for a short time before they go on their own.
Female warthogs only have four teats, so litter sizes usually are confined to four young. Each piglet has its “own” teat and suckles exclusively from it. Even if one piglet dies, the others do not suckle from the available teat. Although the young are suckled for about 4 months, after 2 months they get most of their nourishment from grazing.
Predators
Lions and leopards are the warthog’s chief enemies. Warthogs protect themselves from predators by fleeing or sliding backwards into a hole, thus being in a position to use their formidable tusks in an attack.
Did you know?
The warthog has poor vision (though better than most other African wild pigs), but its senses of smell and hearing are good.
When alarmed, the warthog grunts or snorts, lowers its mane, flattens its ears and bolts for underground cover.

Amazing Bull Moose Archery Shot [Video]

I have seen bucks from my treestand that got my knees shaking. I can’t imagine how I would be able to stay in my tree with a mature bull moose just yards from me.

 

Check out his video as a mature bull steps in the open just yards from the hunter.

 

Somehow the hunter kept his composure, and made a perfect shot on the moose.

 

The loss of blood from the moose is amazing.

 

Will Your Bow be Ready for Deer Season?

Deer season has been over for several months now. Some hunters are OK with waiting for fall to roll back around, but most are ready to get outdoors and enjoy what summer has to offer. Now is the perfect time to start shooting your bow at home, at a 3-D course, or in a league.

Maybe you are looking to purchase a new bow, or just tune the one you already have. It varies among archers how often they bring their bow in for a check-up, but I recommend not waiting more than 2 years. If your gear sees a lot of action, bring it to the shop yearly.

Now is the time to make changes to your bow and accessories if at all possible. Two years ago, my bow limb cracked while I was hunting out of state waiting for my home opener. With only three days before the Illinois bow season opened, I was buying a new bow. Now this was something that was out of my control, but too many hunters make changes too close to the beginning of season that could and should have been done months before.

Don’t make changes, like a new arrow rest or type of broadheads, and expect your arrows to fly true. To avoid frustration and undo stress, make any changes to your gear as early in the year as you can. This will give you plenty of time to work out any flaws in your set-up, and to get your arrows shooting tight groups.

Something as simple as changing the type of release you use can cause negative consequences to your shooting. Knowing this, make any changes to your equipment, what is on your bow, or in your quiver as early as you can.

It is especially important to make changes early if you are buying a new bow, shafts or broadheads. Even though I killed a nice deer eleven days after having to purchase the new bow I mentioned before, I feel lucky to have been able to get my bow ready in time. Under normal circumstances it would have taken me the entire summer to feel comfortable enough to take a new bow to the woods.

One thing hunters do not think about are the muscles used to pull a bow back. These muscles are rarely used for other activities, and take some time to get built up. The best way to do this is to shoot your bow every day. Not only will you become a better shot, but your muscles will have gained the necessary strength back.

I mentioned at the very beginning of this article about getting out and shooting your bow, or joining a league. I can’t think of anything better to get you prepared for the upcoming season. Not only does practice make you a better shot, but the more time you spend shooting, your confidence will skyrocket and you will be a better hunter for it. If you are confident hitting a target at 30-yards, a 15-yard shot at a deer will be simple.

Also, practice helps you judge distance. Rangefinders are nice, and I recommend all hunters having one, but you can’t rely on one at all times. With practice at unknown yardage, judging distance will be easier when the battery is dead on your rangefinder, or you don’t have time to use it.

A change that sometimes skips the mind of hunters is that you might have to adjust your sight pins if you increase or decrease the poundage your are pulling. It might also mean changing the size of the arrow you are shooting if you change you draw weight.

Fall is the best time to be a deer hunter, but hunting is a year-round endeavor, and that includes having your bow ready.

Doe Management: 4 Does in 9 Seconds [Video]

I am sure most of us have heard about doe management, but how many does are too many.

One hunter in Maryland shot 4 does in 9 seconds.

I am sure some areas of the country need a lot of does removed, and this hunter certainly did his part.

Follow this link to some good deer hunting advice,and check out this video to see how it all went down

Proper Shot Placement on Elk

Elk season still might be a few months away, but it is not too early to start thinking and planning your hunt. One thing that every hunter should be aware of is proper shot placement.

After spending your hard earned money, planning, scouting and more for what might be a hunt of a lifetime, you don’t want to blow it with a bad shot.

Elkhunting.org has some great advice for proper shot placement on elk.

The best bowshot that a hunter can take on an elk is when it’s standing broadside. The amount of penetration required to hit a vital organ is minimal when an elk is standing broadside. This shot placement is also the best when try to hit both lungs in one shot which would result in the collapses of both lungs and a much quicker death. You’ll need to make sure that you adjust for elevation before you take your broadside shot. You can find the best spot by following up the back of the front leg 1/3 to 1/2 up the chest cavity of the elk. By using that method you’ll find that your arrow is now aimed at the center of both lungs and the top of the heart. If the elk happens to have its front legs spread apart then simply just follow up the upside down v-shape of the legs 1/2 to 1/3 up to the chest.

The quartering away shot isn’t ideal for larger game such as elk due to the positioning of their intestinal tracts and that their girth is broader than small game such as deer. The positioning of an elk’s intestinal tracts will degrade arrow penetration and while it may mortality wounded it can suffer for days and make recovery impossible. Sometimes the contents of an elk’s stomach can decrease the arrow’s energy and even prevent the arrow from reaching any vital organs.

If you do attempt to use this type of shot placement on an elk it’s important that you wait for the best possible quartering away shot. The best spot to place your razor tipped arrow will be in line with the far front leg about one-third to one-half up the elk’s body cavity. The bow hunter needs to try and take shot that will penetrate both lungs and the heart while passing through as little intestines as possible. The actual location where you attempt your shot will be different each time and depend which way the animal is quartering away. Never take a quartering away shot if you are farther than your effective range

Two Coyotes Taken With One Arrow [Video]

Not many hunters can say they have killed a coyote with a bow, let alone 2 coyotes with one arrow.

It is hard to get a coyote to come into bow range, without being noticed. If you have deer hunted for any amount of time, you know how easy coyotes can bust you.

When hunter, Christopher Jay, had 2 coyotes within 50 yards, he let an arrow fly. Christopher did the unthinkable by taking out 2 coyotes at one time. Truly awesome.

Thanks to this hunter, there will be a few more whitetail fawns making it through the spring.

Do You Want A Job That Is Bowhunter Friendly?

Do you wish you had a job that would allow you to bowhunt more?

There just never seems to be enough time to pursue our passion. We’re either going to work early, working late, we work far from home, or have to work weekends.

Believe it or not, but there are some jobs out there that are bowhunter friendly. They offer good hours that allow hunters to spend more time in the woods. The staff at Bowhunting.com has compiled eight jobs that are bowhunter-friendly.

Business Owner

There are a few major up sides of owning your own business, no matter what industry it’s in. I owned a small company for about 5 years before merging with another larger company. I was lucky enough to have a hand full of employees that I could trust to handle things when I was not around. So when deer season rolled around, I could cut out half way through the day to go hunting. This allowed me to go hunting just about every evening during deer season. Of course, when you own your own business you don’t have to ask for time off either. So planning your vacation around the rut is pretty simple… [continued]

Tell us what you think in the comments section below.

Hunter Misses His Mark, Shoots Buck in Antler [VIDEO]

As hunters, we’ve all made a bad shot on an animal. If you hunt long enough, it’s bound to happen. Every hunter misses eventually.

When it does happen, all we can hope for is to recover the animal, or that the wound was not life-threatening. We hate to do it, and for most of us, it’s a rare occurrence.

Mistakes are made for a number of reasons. The animal might have moved, the arrow or bullet may have hit an object in flight, buck fever… the list is endless.

I couldn’t even guess as to why this hunter missed, but I can tell you it was not a fatal injury. You can tell that the targeted buck was not happy, as he stares down the hunter. I wonder what was going through the hunter and the deer’s mind after this shot.

Would You Get This Close to a Bull Moose? [VIDEO]

Bowhunters like to be as close to a moose as possible for shooting.

But it’s possible to be too close.

I think this bowhunter was on the edge of being a little too close. Five yards from a mature bull moose, with only the open air separating you from the giant, is close. Not to mention that the only defense if the moose decided to charge is an arrow.